NEWS: Leonev’s Last Voyage & Space Cat’s First Flight

Talking of reaching for the stars and finding Earth, can we all doff our helmets to Alexei Leonev who passed away this week? What an extraordinary man. In those early days of space travel, the Space Race recruited plenty of courageous explorers. But rarely were they so articulate about what they experienced, so artistic in their vision. Leonev is best known for undertaking the first ever space walk or EVA. His own paintings show him as a white suit hanging on an umbilical cord above the blue planet. The dark visor reflects the deep, leaves us to guess the emotions of a man untethered from his homeworld.

NEWS: An Autumn of Rockets

As Space X's Starship rocket takes to the skies this October, Space Cat Press unveils our own out-of-this-world series of launch events. Our first title, Desert Moonfire: The Men Who Raced to Space is now on sale. To mark its lift-off, we invite you to a book fair, a FREE writing workshop and a book launch featuring model rockets, moon cake, and an explosive story! All this and our first open submission window coming up.

Review: AD ASTRA Movie

Does the world need another movie about a middle-aged white man riding a spaceship into the dark to save the world? AD ASTRA is a conspicuously old-fashioned film. Yet its weary dystopian mood belies the gripping space adventure tropes. The movie’s true subject is how the Right Stuff of Space Race heroism morphed into the Toxic Maculinity of our own age. As Brad Pitt pursues long-lost father Tommy Lee Jones to the ends of the solar system, the male heart-to-heart has never been more one-way or awkward.

Review: SEMIOSIS, Sue Burke

SEMIOSIS is an extraordinary First Contact novel where humans are the alien invaders. It isn’t the first to feature intelligent plant life but this is no 'Day of the Triffids'. Burke's talking plants will rewire your synapses. Unpredictable, urgent, occasionally bloody, the story is page-turning yet its characters and themes embed themselves deeply. Like snow-vine thorns.

Review: THE BOOKMAN, Lavie Tidhar

‘The Bookman’ by Lavie Tidhar, is quite simply, tremendous fun. It’s a rollicking steampunk adventure that mashes together fantasy, sci-fi and Gothic with a smattering of ancient mythology. Only here can you find characters called Orphan and Gilgamesh jostling for space alongside Isabella Beeton, Karl Mark and Tom Thumb. And then there's the mysterious Bookman, a terrorist who favours exploding books. Yes, the book is mightier than the sword.